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Course: Windows Users Introduction to Linux

Windows Users Introduction to Linux

  • Life Time Access
  • Certificate on Completion
  • Access on Android and iOS App
About this Course

This is an introductory course in Linux. In this course you will learn where to get Linux, how to install it, and how to use it. The class focuses on learning how to use the Linux desktop to encourage you to start using it for day to day work. You will also learn some of the basics that you need for supporting Linux servers as well.

Learning to use Linux for day to day use will help you become very comfortable with it so that you will find Linux fun, and also see the power of it. You will also build the solid foundation that you need to build on for becoming an incredible Linux system administrator too.

Basic knowledge
  • This is an introduction to Linux. So no previous Linux skill is needed. You should have basic skills in installing operating systems, and in computer usage
What you will learn
  • This is an introductory course in Linux. In this course you will learn where to get Linux, how to install it, and how to use it. The class focuses on learning how to use the Linux desktop to encourage you to start using it for day to day work. You will also learn some of the basics that you need for supporting Linux servers as well.
  • Learning to use Linux for day to day use will help you become very comfortable with it so that you will find Linux fun, and also see the power of it. You will also build the solid foundation that you need to build on for becoming an incredible Linux system administrator too.
Curriculum
Number of Lectures: 21
Total Duration: 01:58:23
Introduction
  • Welcome  

    Welcome to my course on an introduction to Linux for Windows users.

  • History of Linux  

    This is a brief history of Linux. You will hear where Linux came from and how it developed from a personal project for fun to the powerhouse operating system it is today.

Choosing a distro and installing
  • What is a distro?  

    When you purchase Windows you have basically Windows. There are a couple variations for desktops for home and pro. Then there are a couple versions of server. But basically they are all Windows workstation or Windows server. With Linux there are a myriad of versions, or distributions, of Linux. These are usually called distros for short. This lesson will show you a good way to review different distros, and help decide what to get. The nice thing with Linux is you can get them all for free, and if you don't like one then it is really easy to download a different one to try.

  • Downloading the ISO and making bootable media  

    Once you choose a distro you need to download the software. You typically will download an ISO file, and then either mount that for an install as a virtual machine in a hypervisor, or you need to create bootable media.

  • Doing a basic install of Linux workstation  

    So for this course we are focusing on setting up a Linux workstation. In this lesson we set up Linux Mint with the Cinnamon desktop. There are a lot of nice options out there, but in my opinion Linux Mint Cinnamon is probably one of the most usable desktop distros. It is especially useful for those switching from Windows, or trying to use both Windows and Linux. The basic format of the desktop is very similar to Windows. So you will find it very comfortable. Installing new software is also very easy. It is an Ubuntu based Linux distro.

Using your Linux workstation
  • Using your new Linux workstation  

    Now that you have a functional Linux workstation it is time to take a look around.

  • Adjusting the look of your new workstation  

    One of the fun things with computers is to customize your desktop environment and look.

  • Installing software from the GUI  

    There is a lot of software that gets installed in Linux Mint by default. But I am sure there will be many things you will want to add that are not there by default. There are a fair number of games. There are a surprising number of productivity applications. You may need a photo or video editor. Well there is a lot you can choose from. With Mint there is a great GUI tool for installing new applications. It does not have every application for Linux. But there is a large selection to choose from.

  • Installing software at the command line  

    Sometimes you need to install software from the command line, even on workstations. If you are managing a server then you will almost always be doing command line software installs. We cover how to install software on Ubuntu based systems here using the command line.

The Linux file system
  • Understanding the file system  

    The Linux file system is a bit different than the Windows file system. It is not hard to understand. It just takes a bit of explanation.

  • Using Nemo to manage files  

    If you are using Linux as a workstation with a GUI you have a GUI tool for getting to the file system. In Linux Mint it is Nemo. There are others out there that you can use. They all pretty much work similarly. This lesson covers using Nemo to manage your files.

  • Navigating the file system on the command line`  

    Unlike in Windows, with Linux you will find you spend a fair amount of time on the command line. If you are working with Linux servers it will all be command line work. So learning how to move around on the command line in the file system is vital.

  • Understanding file system permissions  

    Linux is designed as a multi-user operating system. So one of the things that is important to learn is how to deal with permissions in the file system. You have user ownership and group ownership. You also have specific rights on the files. It is not uncommon to need to adjust file ownership and permissions on the files. So it is important to understand file system permissions.

Working with text files
  • Viewing text files on the command line  

    You will use text files a lot on Linux. Configuration is often done in text files. There are other files you will need to work with as well. Sometimes you simply need to view files. There are some cool tools in Linux for viewing text files.

  • Editing files using a graphical editor  

    If you are using a Linux workstation you have the option of using GUI text editors. Some people prefer to use a GUI text editor.

  • Editing text files with vi  

    There are a few good text editors that you can use at the command line. One of the oldest is vi (pronounced vee eye). It is a modal editor that is a favorite of old school Linux and Unix administrators. You may find that it is not a favorite of yours, but if you find you need to administer Linux and Unix servers it is good to get at least a basic understanding of the editor because you will find times you need to use it as the only option on the server.

  • Redirecting command line output  

    When you are working at the command line often you will want to do more with the command output then simply look at it on the screen. Or you might want to handle errors separate from normal output. You can even send the output to files that you can work with later. This lesson will help you understand how to handle the output of commands at the command line.

Managing users and groups
  • Adding users and groups with the GUI tool  

    When you are working on a workstation you have GUI tools for managing users and groups. There are a number of different tools you can choose from. Each one has benefits and shortfalls. In this lesson we cover one tool.

  • Adding users at the command line  

    If you are working with a Linux server then you will do all your work at the command line. But even on a graphical Linux workstation you might want to use the command line to create users because you have more power and flexibility. It is easy to create the users at the command line once you learn the command and how to run it.

  • Adding groups at the command line  

    You might find it much easier to create groups at the command line. Group creation is a very easy task.

  • Resetting passwords`  

    This lesson will show you how to reset passwords on the command line. It covers both resetting your own password along with other peoples passwords if you have root privileges.

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