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Course: How to Teach Online 24/7/365

How to Teach Online 24/7/365

  • Life Time Access
  • Certificate on Completion
  • Access on Android and iOS App
About this Course

Introduction

A survey conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group regarding online learning showed that the number of students enrolled in one or more online courses was nearly 7 million in 2011. This was more than a half million increase over 2010. At the college level, 32 percent of students are taking at least one online course.

As online education literally explodes, the issue facing the education system is that teaching online is not the same as teaching face to face. If you’re a teacher, be it home school, public school, Bible study teacher, or someone who teaches a special skill or subject, you know this.

The question for many people wishing to transition to teaching in a virtual classroom is a very simple one: How do I do an effective job of teaching online?

That’s the question this course is designed to answer. In this course, University of Phoenix Advanced Certified Online Instructor David Lantz walks you through the teaching strategies being used by the best online college instructors to teach in an asynchronous online course.

Lesson Materials

A total of 17 video lessons divided between 3 course modules constitute the core of the learning materials. These videos are recorded power point presentations converted to video designed to emphasize key learning objectives. Additionally, each module is accompanied by an ebook (PDF) designed to round out the video presentations. Each module is introduced and concluded by a video of the course creator, David Lantz.

A fourth module, Next Steps, concludes the course, and offers several other resources the student may wish to take advantage of.

Depending on the pace of the online learner, one should plan to spend about four hours going through the materials. 

Course Organization

The course is divided into three modules. The first module, Creating a Culture of Self- Discipline Online, is designed to help you learn how to motivate your students to develop the self-discipline required to learn in the online environment. This module is, in turn subdivided into three parts.

  • Learning Modality and Student Motivation
  • Establishing Participation Expectations
  • Building an Online Community

The second module, Managing the Online Classroom, recognizes that online facilitation involves three basic areas of focus: organizational, social, and intellectual. The instructor, therefore, should see his or her role as being that as a facilitator of online learning, rather than simply the “Sage on the Stage.” This module is also subdivided into three parts.

  • Socratic Teaching: How to Teach by Asking Questions
  • It’s ALL About What you Say and How You Say It
  • Online Interaction: Best Practices

The third module, Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom, examines the trend of having the student access the “lecture” via video/online instruction created by the instructor or another educator before coming to a face to face class. The role of the classroom teacher changes from Lecturer to Mentor. Rather than spending time teaching in class, the instructor uses learning-based activities. Doing this effectively requires the teacher to put a lot of effort into his/her course preparation up front. This module delivers the following three sessions:

  • Enabling Your Students to Learn 24/7/365
  • Creating Your On Demand Unidirectional Materials 
  • Exploring an Asynchronous Learning Management Classroom

Why Take This Course

The explosion in online learning requires educators who know how to teach online. Key research findings about student learning in the online classroom underscore the importance of having instructors who can manage the online classroom to insure that students learn. Online facilitation involves three basic areas of focus: organizational, social, and intellectual. How to Teach in the Online Classroom 24/7/365 covers all three of these aspects of online instruction to prepare you to teach online.

About David Lantz

Hello, my name is David Lantz. I’ve been teaching online at the college level since 2004. I was voted Faculty of the Year by the first graduating class of the Indianapolis Campus of the University of Phoenix. In May of 2012, I was awarded that school’s Advanced Facilitator Certification. In addition to teaching online for University of Phoenix, I teach for 3 other schools on such subjects as statistics, economics, E-commerce, and public relations. Five years ago, I set about the process of showing others how to teach online. I worked with my first pilot group of 8 students over a four week period to demonstrate best practice techniques for online, asynchronous teaching. With Simpliv's powerful online course delivery system, I now have a way to take what we did in that prototype class and demonstrate the art of online instruction via video and downloadable text instruction.

Welcome to my course!

Who is the target audience?

  • Are you a teacher - be it home school, public school, Bible study teacher, or someone who teaches a special skill or subject who wants to learn how to teach online? This course is for you
Basic knowledge
  • Have internet access and the ability to play streaming audio and video. Additionally, download and print or store PDF files
What you will learn
  • My goal for you in taking this course is two-fold: Recognize what it takes to do an effective job of teaching online, and prepare yourself to enter a field where demand is expanding rapidly
  • To fulfill these goals, you will learn about the following three components of effective online instruction: Creating a culture of self-discipline so that your students are motivated to learn; Managing the online classroom to maximize student engagement and learning; Preparing to teach in the evolving online, "flipped," classroom
Curriculum
Lectures quantity: 24
Common duration: 01:29:48
Introduction to The Course
  • How to Teach Online 24/7/365  

    In this video, David Lantz welcomes you to his course, How to Teach Online 2/7/365. In this introduction, you'll learn more about how the course is organized, how it came about, as well as who David is and why you will want to take this course. Please be sure to download the PDF syllabus file for the course to learn more about the learning objectives for each lesson.


  • Course Syllabus  

    Please be sure to download the PDF syllabus file for the course to learn more about the learning objectives for each lesson.


  • Accessing Course Materials  

    This lesson provides a brief overview of how to access materials in this course.


  • Course Outline  
Creating a Culture of Self-Discipline Online
  • An Introduction to the Module: Creating a Culture of Self-Discipline Online  

    In this video, David Lantz welcomes you to the first module of his course, Creating a Culture of Self-Discipline Online. David briefly introduces the learning objectives for each lesson, and invites you to consider how you can help your students complete the courses you teach when they sign up to take them.  Please be sure to download the PDF text file, Creating A Culture of Self-Discipline Online, that accompanies this module.


  • Creating Culture of Self-Discipline Ebook  

    Please be sure to download the PDF ebook, Creating A Culture of Self-Discipline Online, that accompanies this module.

  • Learning Modality and Student Motivation  

    In this lecture, we recognize that students either require extrinsic motivation, where you offer either carrots or sticks to complete the course, or intrinsic motivation – where they provide their own internal motivation to take your course. This lecture touches on the importance of learning modality and the steps you can take to help motivate your students to get the most out of your course.  


  • Establishing Participation Expectations  

    In this lecture, we examine asynchronous communication and how it is used in managing an interactive classroom. We introduce the concept of posting discussion questions, and define substantive participation. 


  • Building an Online Community  

    If you want your students to maximize what they get out of your course, build a sense of community between your students and yourself. Create a friendly, welcoming environment where everyone wants to help everyone else learn. This lecture explores ways to do this.

  • Conclusion to Creating Discipline Module  

    David concludes this module by reflecting on this quote by Richard Vogel: "The value for an online course indicates that if a student took the course online, their grade was likely to be 16 percent higher than if the course had been taken in the traditional classroom. … As has been noted elsewhere in this paper, the online format does require a certain level of commitment and self-motivation on the part of a student to complete."



Managing the Online Classroom
  • Introduction to Module: Managing the Online Classroom  

    In this video, David Lantz welcomes you to the second module of his course, Managing the Online Classroom. David briefly introduces the learning objectives for each lesson, and invites you to consider how online facilitation involves three basic areas of focus: Organizational, social, and intellectual  Please be sure to download the PDF text file, Managing the Online Classroom E-book, that accompanies this module.


  • Managing the Online Classroom Ebook  

    Please be sure to download the PDF ebook, Managing the Online Classroom E-book, that accompanies this module.

  • Socratic Teaching: Avoid Being the Sage on the Stage  

    In this lecture, we look at how the art of teaching online must incorporate the knowledge and experiences of learners. Traditional sage on the stage teaching methods where the “teacher teaches while students learn” must give way to leveraging the “wisdom of the crowd” through the art of teaching by asking questions, otherwise known as Socratic Instruction.


  • Online Interaction: It’s ALL About Technique and Tone  

    In the interactive online classroom, we can’t make use of facial expressions, eye contact and body language like we do in a face to face classroom. In this lecture, we examine some mistakes instructors can make that hurt communication in the online classroom. We drill down into specific online techniques and how you come across – your “tone” – to keep the conversation going online. 


  • Online Interaction: Best Practices  

    To create interaction in the online classroom that maximizes student learning, we examine how to link discussion questions to conversations designed to achieve the learning objectives. We’ll look at stylistic posting techniques to highlight key parts of the online conversation, and how to use the “Fly Wheel Effect” to help keep conversations about the material moving.


  • Discussion Questions Example  
  • Conclusion to Managing the Online Classroom  

    David concludes this module by quoting Pamela Vesely: "One clear take-away from this study is that it is incumbent upon faculty to play a leadership role in building community in their virtual classrooms. As this study has shown, students believe instructor modeling is the most important element in building online community." 



Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom
  • Introduction to Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom  

    In this module, we will contrast traditional teaching, where class time is used to lecture, with “flipped classroom” teaching, where students review videos at their own pace, and then spend time in class applying what they learned to actual situations. We’ll examine how to enable your students to learn 24/7/365, ways to create your on demand unidirectional materials, and how to prepare to teach in an online learning management platform. Please be sure to download the PDF text file, Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom E-Book, that accompanies this module.


  • Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom Ebook  

    Please be sure to download the PDF text file, Preparing to Teach in the Flipped Classroom E-Book, that accompanies this module.

  • Enabling Your Students to Learn 24 / 7 / 365  

    In the flipped classroom, the student accesses video/online instruction created by the instructor or another educator before coming to class. This method can be used for both face to face and online instruction. In this lesson, we consider how online teaching makes use of the flipped classroom, and asks you to think about how you change from teaching by lecturing to teaching by mentoring.


  • Creating Your “On Demand” Unidirectional Materials  

    To develop a course on any topic, you must first choose your text/learning materials. In this lesson, we look at ways to ways to create video presentations based on your materials, starting with a power point presentation that you narrate, animate, and convert to video. I’ll show you the same techniques I use to create the video lessons you’ve been watching. 


  • Navigating the Online Discussion Forum  

    In this lesson, using an actual online Yahoo discussion forum, we’ll examine the layout of an online classroom. We’ll examine some common discussion forum tools, such as folders, polls, and file upload systems. We’ll talk about how you can prepare your learning materials for delivery through your chosen learning management system. And, we’ll consider how Udemy’s learning platform can be used to communicate asynchronously with the people who take your course.


  • Conclusion to Teaching in the Flipped Classroom  

    David concludes this module by quoting Chip Chase: "Teachers who choose to create their own videos quickly learn that filming, editing and publishing lectures can be quite complicated. In addition, after creating videos to be viewed as homework, teachers still have to prepare lessons to fill all the class time now available to them."



Next Steps
  • Next Steps  

    Now that you’ve completed the course, I’d like to leave you with these concluding thoughts.

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Course Language
English
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