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Course: Wedding Photography: Tips, Tricks & Ideas for Amazing Photos

Wedding Photography: Tips, Tricks & Ideas for Amazing Photos

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  • Certificate on Completion
  • Access on Android and iOS App
About this Course

Does this sound like you?

You’re a photographer who's been asked to take photos at a friends wedding. They asked because they’ve seen some of your nice images, but you’re naturally concerned that you’ll let them down.

You have a few weddings under your belt, and want to gain confidence, improve quickly and develop your own style.

You’ve photographed quite a few weddings but want to learn some new creative ideas or maybe you’re just interested in learning how to become a great wedding photographer

What you’ll learn:

Learn how to capture some of the wonderful emotional moments throughout the day, how to get very natural looking posed photos, how to relax the couple and families for more natural expressions, plus you’ll be amazed at some of the creative ideas that you can easily use yourself.

This course covers the whole wedding in chronological order, from the bride getting ready at home or hotel, through to their first dance. Learn from the huge number of wedding images shown throughout the course (complete with camera settings), while I narrate and explain how I achieved the photos.

Lecture downloads are enabled for this course

Section PDF of image thumbnails, keep them with you and use as reminders

Here are just some of the things you'll learn in this course:

  • Learn how to cope and take great images during the (sometimes stressful) getting ready phase
  • Discover some creative and unusual ideas for great photos while the bride gets ready
  • Ideas for photos while guests and families arrive at the the church or ceremony
  • How to take great ‘Ring’ photos before the ceremony
  • Learn the secrets of great processional (and recessional) photo, i.e walking the aisle
  • Discover the many ideas for photos during the ceremony and how to plan in order to capture some ‘moments’
  • Learn some useful techniques to use while the couple are signing the register/ marriage license
  • Learn what to do and get some great photos when everyone leaves the church or ceremony and mayhem ensues!!
  • Ideas for taking the couple with their posh car or carriage as they leave for the reception
  • Learn to capture some fun confetti throwing moments
  • Great tips for the formal individual and group photos
  • Don’t just stick to the line-ups, but learn some creative ideas for photographing the bride and groom, and the groomsmen and bridesmaids
  • Learn to capture the fun atmosphere of the wedding speeches
  • Tips for photographing the first dance

Plus much much more, please check out the course lessons below for more info.

What are the requirements?

  • You should have a DSLR or ‘Mirrorless’ camera
  • You should have a reasonable understanding of your camera
  • You should be personable and enjoy meeting and chatting to new people
  • You’ll benefit if you’ve attended a wedding or two
  • You’ll need to be enthusiastic, and keen to learn and practice
  • Enroll now or watch a couple of free lectures to get going!

Who is the target audience?

  • Anyone generally interested in wedding photography
  • Students who want to take more creative wedding photos
  • A DSLR or Mirrless camera and a reasonable understanding of its use
  • Not for complete beginners
Basic knowledge
  • This course does not cover post processing of images
  • This course does not cover the business side of wedding photography
What you will learn
  • Understand the structure of a wedding day
  • Start to develop confidence to tackle wedding photography
  • Capture natural looking posed and staged photos
  • Capture some of the authentic wedding moments
  • Take more creative photos during the wedding day
Curriculum
Lectures quantity: 42
Common duration: 02:03:25
Introduction
  • Introduction  
The Bride Getting Ready
  • It starts here: Photographing the dress and shoes at the bride's home or hotel  

    After a short introduction to the getting ready stage, I explain how you can let go of some of the tension and spend a comfortable few minutes on your own with the dress and shoes.

    It's a great way to start, and so here's some tips for getting some great images.

  • Bride applying makeup, close up shot  

    Tips for getting some great shots while the bride is having her makeup done

    I used to get in close for these types of shots, so for me it was all about using the angles and making the best of the light.

    The video explains my approach.

  • Photographing the bride's dress as it's being done up  

    This makes a nice photo for the album, a shot of the back of the dress as it's being done up. The trick is to use turn the flash off and use some nice light, otherwise it just turns into a simple snapshot.

    The video explains my thoughts and approach for getting these types of images.

  • Photographing other items of clothing as they're being done up  

    Doing up other things - clothes, jewellery, buttonholes etc...

    It's a fun part of the day isn't it? All the clothes, necklaces, other jewellery, cravats etc.. have been carefully chosen by the bridal party. You can get some great shots while all these things are being put on, tied up and admired.


    The lecture explains my thoughts and approach for getting photos of 'things being done up'.

  • Don’t overlook those small but important details  

    The small but important details

    In many weddings, a lot of thought goes into the small but important details. Could be some lovely jewellery, or cards from well wishers, or perfume, or gifts to parents. These things play a part in most weddings, so I always made sure to capture them the best I could.

  • Shooting through a doorway or structure for a reportage photo  

    You will have seen this before in TV and cinema thrillers and dramas

    This is a little trick used by film makers, especially in tense TV and film thrillers. Use this technique to make it look like you've captured your subject completely unawares.

    The lecture explains the idea in more detail.

  • Photos of family member looking over the speech and other notes  

    Sometimes, you may spot someone going over a speech that they'll be making later in the day, or someone may be writing out a card. It's worth keeping an eye out for these type of actions and get a quick shot when you can.

  • Parents seeing the bride for the first time  

    Seeing their daughter looking beautiful can provide a wonderful moment

    Here's another little moment to be aware of, the bride now looking (hopefully) resplendent in her beautiful dress, one or both parents seeing her completely ready for the first time.

    Watch out for that moment.

  • Bride by a window – flatter her with soft light  

    Close up of bride by a window

    So now the bride is ready and looking gorgeously beautiful, she might be running late, but you'll still want to get a few of these types of images by a window. Get some great shots in a short amount of time.

  • Bride by a window - against the light, featuring the dress  

    If there was still time before the bride had to dash off, I'd find a large window and get her to look out. Shooting against the light, I'd try to get a photo that showed off her dress

  • Bride relaxing on a sofa looking out of a window  

    Here's another idea for a relaxed photo of the bride, this time just spread out on a sofa for a great quiet calm kind of look.

  • Bride walking down the stairs  

    Get a moody shot of the bride as she walks slowly down the stairs (assuming there are some). It's a really easy shot to get, and can benefit if you're lucky enough to have some nice light coming in through maybe a window.

  • Getting Ready Section - PDF of thumbnails (see Resources)  

    No video here, please use the 'Resources' link to download the PDF document containing reminders of this chapter's photos.

The Ceremony
  • Arriving at the church  

    The bride in her car with dad or whoever is giving her away, groomsmen and the bridal party arriving, guests arriving and milling about. It's all happening, so be prepared! Here's a few ideas that should help

  • Photographing the wedding rings  

    Preferring not to ask the happy couple to remove their rings once married, I used to grab some quick shots before the ceremony.

    This lecture shows how I approached the ring shots.

  • Walking the aisle - Photographing the processional and recessional  

    I've always felt that this was one of the truly lovely moments of the wedding day. The last time the father (or whoever is giving away the bride) will have a single daughter / brother / sister etc..., followed in the recessional by the first moments of the bride and groom as husband and wife.

    This lecture shows how I approached the bride walking down the aisle with father or husband

  • Capturing the groom’s first sight of his bride  

    Capturing the groom watching his beautiful bride come down the aisle

    Although I like to think this idea is sound, sad to report that it rarely worked out quite as well as I'd hoped, I only have myself to blame for not planning it out as well as I should have. If you learn from my mistakes here you can capture a great reportage authentic moment.

    This lecture shows how I approached the groom seeing his bride for the first time, walking down the aisle

  • Capturing some wedding ceremony moments – Part I  

    General tips and ideas for capturing some great photos during the ceremony

    You obviously can't stage any photos during the ceremony, but there are always great moments that you can watch out for and capture. The secret is to be prepared for them, and in some cases to know they're coming. This lecture shows:-

    • Sneaky looks between the couple
    • Capturing laughter during the ceremony
    • Including the congregation in your images
  • Capturing some wedding ceremony moments – Part 2  

    More general tips and ideas for capturing some great photos during the ceremony

    Following on from the previous video, this one shows some more tips and idea for photos during the ceremony:-

    • Capturing the exchange of rings
    • Close up of hands
    • Dramatic photos from the back of the church or ceremony room
    • Capturing the kiss
  • Signing the register / marriage license  

    Of course you have to capture the smiley, formal shot after the signing of the register, the couple expect that. But here's a few ideas and tips for a little more creativity

  • The Ceremony Section - PDF of thumbnails (see Resources)  

    No video here, please use the 'Resources' link to download the PDF document containing reminders of this chapter's photos.

After the Ceremony
  • Dramatic image of bride and groom in the church doorway  

    Here's an idea for something a little more creative as the the bride and groom leave the church or ceremony room. Shoot against the light with their backs towards you for something a little different.

  • Capturing the hugs and kisses immediately following the ceremony  

    Rather than rush straight into the formal photos, I used to get in close with a wide angle lens and tried to capture some of that great emotion that usually occurred when people hugged and kissed after the ceremony

  • Throwing of the confetti - always a great action shot  

    In this lectuer I'll describe my foolproof way (more or less) of capturing the happy couple while they get bombarded with confetti by the guests.The main thing to remember is to take control of the situation well before it starts, otherwise youi might find the confetti gets thrown while your back is turned. Not what you want!!

  • A few tips for taking formal photos of the bride  

    These are typically the photos that the bride's parents and grand-parents are expecting so they can be framed and placed on a lounge sideboard. So it's important to get these photos, even they though may not get your creative juices flowing!!

  • Photographing informal photos of the groom  

    I personally never did take formal photos of the groom, preferring instead to go for a more relaxed, natural look. I just felt this was more suited for men. This lecture shows when and how I approached these photos.

  • Photographing relaxedphotos of the groom and his best man  

    For me it's all about fun when photographing the groom and his best man. Most best men, will have known the groom for many years and would enjoy a laugh and a joke with them, so that's what I'd try and capture. This 

    lecture shows when and how I approached these photos

  • An idea for a strong, dramatic photo of the groom  

    Here's a pretty simple idea for something a little creative with the groom. Place him against a good looking wall, put on a fish-eye or very wide angle lens, get in close and low and add a bit of sparkle in post processing.

  • The bride and groom standing and sitting in the car or carriage  

    If the wedding breakfast or reception is in a different location to the church or ceremony room, then the bride and groom will usually hire a car. It's generally a posh one, so you want to get some good shots of the bride and groom in the car and leaving in it. Here's how I approached these photos.

  • After the Ceremony Section - PDF of thumbnails (see Resources)  

    No video here, please use the 'Resources' link to download the PDF document containing reminders of this chapter's photos.

The Reception
  • Drinks on a tray - get in quick before they go  

    Here's an idea for a quick shot of the drinks all lined up and ready to go, but instead of a straight photo of the drinks, why not shoot wide with one of the bridal party in the background.

  • The formal group photos - the families will always ask for these  

    I used to keep the family group photos fairly simple, using good light while carefully considering the backgound. Although the posing is important, I liked to try and elicit good expressions from everyone. So I'd keep chatting and made sure I took several photos of the same pose in case anyone blinked or looked away.

  • Ideas for photographing the groomsmen and bridesmaids  

    There's many different ways of photographing the groomsmen and bridesmaids, they're generally youngsters so it always works well to capture them laughing and joking. Here's a few of my ideas.

  • Bride and groom kissing to cheering friends  

    Ok, even I have to admit it, this one's a bit cheesy!! But you know what, it's fun and couples like it, and so do I. So there!

    I sometimes used to get the happy couples kissing amongst their friends, it looks good, but there's some special things you need to do to get it right.

  • The bouquet and bride with a difference  

    The standard photo of the bouquet will have already been taken while the bride was getting ready. Remember though that a lot of thought generally goes into choosing the flowers, so make the most of the bouquet with this unusual idea.

  • Photographing the bride and groom on their own in a relaxed mood  

    After all the formal photos are done and the rest of the groups photo are in the bag, I would finally get to take the bride and groom out for some informal, relaxed photos. Walking, cuddling, talking, and (almost) kissing, here's my approach to taking these photos.

  • Creative idea for a cake shot, with bride and groom in background  

    After I'd taken the safe standard photo of the bride and groom cutting the cake, I'd try to get something unexpected and a little more creative. Cake in focus in the foreground, with the couple canoodling behind!

  • Photographing the wedding breakfast speeches  

    The speeches generally take place just after or sometimes just before the meal. They can be great fun, and there are usually some lovely moments to capture, and not just the laughter, there's sometimes some very tender moments too.

  • Photographing the first dance  

    The bride and groom's first dance tends to be touching and romantic, it's also usually quite dark, so the problem is how to light it whilst retaining the romantic atmosphere. Sure, you could use a very high ISO with no flash, but then the shutter speed would have to be very slow, and consequently there would be subject movement. Also the couple wouldn't be lit very well. So the challenge is to light the dance with flash, but not to 'overlight' it, i.e not to blast it with light from the flash so that the images become simple snapshots.

    Watch the lecture to see my approach to photographing the first dance.

  • The Reception section - PDF of thumbnails (see Resources)  
Course conclusion
  • Course conclusion  

    After I'd taken the safe standard photo of the bride and groom cutting the cake, I'd try to get something unexpected and a little more creative. Cake in focus in the foreground, with the couple canoodling behind!

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